To już było...

Jak to w Londynie będzie...

Już wkrótce, bo tylko za trzy i pół miesiąca uczniowie naszego gimnazjum wyruszają na podbój Wysp Brytyjskich. Jeśli chcesz dowiedzieć się co zobaczą nasi podróżnicy i sprawdzić jak dobrze znasz angielski zapraszamy do przeczytania pierwszej części naszego mini przewodnika :)

Napisała: Marianna Wcisło klasa 2 B
we współpracy z: Agnieszką Bekiesz

Piccadilly Circus

Piccadilly Circus

Piccadilly Circus is a busy square in the heart of London at the junction of five major streets: Regent street, Shaftesbury Avenue, Piccadilly and Covent Street. The Circus was created by John Nash as part of King George IV's plan to connect Carlton House with Regent's Park. At the center of the Circus stands the Shaftesbury memorial fountain, displaying a statue of Eros. It was built in 1893 to commemorate Lord Shaftesbury, a philanthropist known for his support of the poor. This memorial is one of the most popular meeting places in London. Furthermore, this area is also famous for its electronic advertising displaysas well as The Criterion Theatre and sport shop Lilywhite .

Leicester Square

Leicester Square

Leicester Square is a place created in 1670 between Piccadilly and Covent Garden, just north of Trafalgar Square. Over time it has become very fashionable in town as lots of famous people lived here one of whom was Issak Newton. Today it is centre of West End - fun province. By night Leicester Square is one of the busiest spots in London. Buskers entertain the crowds with anything from an impromptu song to a political rant, tourists pay good money to have their faces ridiculed by cruel cartoonists and suburban kids queue to dance the night away at the Hippodrome, Equinox or Maximus. Furthermore, here 2 famous cinames can be found The Empire and Art Decko Odeon. In this square there are also sale point of cheap theatre tickets, Shakespeare's fountain and Chaplin's statue.

Trafalgar Square

Trafalgar Square

Royal stables used to be in Trafalgar Square. Today lots of parties take place in this area. Furthermore, one can also find here 50-metre high Lord Nelson Statue. Lord Nelson was a man who won a battle of Trafalgar under Napoleon's leadership. From 1805 the statue 'is guarded' by statues of four lions.

National Gallery

National Gallery

The National Gallery houses the national collection of Western European painting from the Early Renaissance (1250) to the Impressionism (the end of the 19th century).

The collection which is on display in the gallery was bought by John Julius Angerstein and shows the most important art schools and tendencies in Europe.

Some of the most popular painting are:

  1. A Young Woman standing at a Virginal by Johannes Vermeer (about 1670-2)
  2. Bacchus and Ariadne by Titian (1520-3)
  3. Self Portrait at the Age of 34 by Rembrandt (1640)
  4. Sunflowers by Vincent van Gogh (1888)
  5. The Arnolfini Portrait by Jan van Eyck (1434)
  6. Venus and Mars by Sandro Botticelli (about 1485)
Buckingham Palace

Buckingham Palace

Buckingham Palace, which was built in 1705, is one of the most famous places in London. The original Buckingham House was expanded and rebuild into Buckingham Palace by king George IV and an architect John Nash. But the changes to the building did not stop there. In 1913 Aston Webb designed and created today's front façade of the Palace. Today Buckingham Palace is the Queens London residence and is used to receive and entertain guests on state, ceremonial and official occasions.

Buckingham Palace possesses also a wonderful garden with a lake and some flamingoes. In this garden many elegant British parties take place. Furthermore, the Palace has something to offer also for painters and art lovers as it has its own Art Gallery and Queen's Gallery. In addition, it is also possible to experience "the royal spirits" while visiting the Throne Room and looking at the thrones of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip. The Changing of the Guard takes place in the forecourt of Buckingham Palace at 11.30 every day in summer, every other day in winter, and lasts about 45 minutes. The New Guard marches to the Palace from Wellington Barracks with a Guards band, the Old Guard hands over in a ceremony during which the sentries are changed and then returns to barracks. The New Guard then marches to St James's Palace leaving the detachment at Buckingham Palace.

Westminster Abbey

Westminster Abbey

This is one of the most famous churches in London. The first monastery was built in this area in the year 800. In this temple there are lots of interesting monuments; for example:

  • Grave of Elizabeth I
  • Coronation throne (1301)
  • Henry VII's Lady Chapel ( built from1457 to 1508)

The Abbey has been the coronation church since 1066 and is the final resting place of seventeen monarchs. The interesting thing related with the Abbey is its Choir and Choir School. Singing has played a hugely important role, from the plainsong Offices sung by the monks of the tenth-century monastic foundation to the daily choral services sung by the Choir of Westminster Abbey today.

Big Ben

Big Ben

The Big Ben is the most popular bell in London. It is a famous monument as well as it is placed in one of the towers of the Houses of Parliament. The tower with the bell and the clock mechanism was completed in 1854. The bell weights 14 tons and its tower is 96 ,3 meters high!

London Eye

London Eye

It was built in 1999 and since then it has been the biggest ferris wheel in the world . The Millenium wheel is 135 meters high and it is equipped with 20 cams. What is also worth noticing is the fact that London Eye makes a full revolution in 30 minutes so that tourist have plenty of time to take extraordinary photographs of the city.